Archive for December, 2011

LTGR Ep. #99: “Read the Syllabus”

Friday, December 30th, 2011

In this episode, Susan and Dan talk about some of the differences in instructional design between business versus traditional education.

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Show Notes:

Is training in instructional design the same for business as traditional education?

They conclude that it is important to focus on what good learning looks like (how people learn). Adult education is liberal arts of training and is transferable into any setting.

When people get excited in a workshop, it is when designers start talking about designing for learning.

Use of syllabi in business…how do you do it? Typically a syllabus is a document that has a lot of information about the course, instructor contact, overarching goals and objectives, schedule, grading, policies. Doesn’t work in business.

The difference is in how you approach a learner and what info they have before they start. What does business provide before or after training? An invoice!

A learning map. Could be a word doc with technical guide or a calendar. May describe types of learning (blended, elearning, LMS, etc.). Usually includes list of topics.

Storyboarding is another example of where business and traditional education diverge. It’s more of a workflow process in business. Not so much in education (because faculty and designer are usually the same person).

Dan and Susan would love to hear how others present the information about their programs if they are not using a traditional syllabus. Tell us by adding to this topic in the comments section below or call us at 1-800-609-9006 x8055 (US and Canada) or 678-255-2174 x8055 (outside US and Canada) to record a message by phone.

LTGR Ep. #98: “Find a Job”

Wednesday, December 7th, 2011

In this episode, Dan and Susan talk with Hadiya Nurridin about looking for a job in instructional design.

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Show Notes:

Who wants a job? Hadiya Nurridin has been a previous guest on the Green Room and returns to share her insights on finding a job in instructional design.  Hadiya formerly worked as an employee in a large corporation and now freelances as a contractor.

Hadiya Nuriddin

Hadiya Nuriddin, M.Ed., CPLP, PHR

Hadiya sees a definite interest in e-learning development. Most calls are about development work through Articulate, Captivate and other products. More prone to outsource this piece.  Employers want conceptual development as well as product knowledge.

You get paid more for knowing more! Soup to nuts.  Contractor work has been more in development realm than in design realm.

Importance of designing attractive modules. Develop your eye.  It’s a skill…work at it. Need to know what a screen bean is?  Read Screen beans .. you had me at goodbye    and   Why looks matter ….   for inspiration.

Designing is creating a relationship between the user and the screen: interface design!

Critical skills on a resume?  Hadiya says:

  • First decide if you want to be a developer or designer.
  • Industry match
  • Project management skills

Dan adds:

  • Know what you are applying for!  Do your background research.  Network.
  • If you are going to try to make connections to the business, make it good!
  • List the products you can use.  Don’t try to stretch it.

For someone with no experience?
Make sure you understand the field and the industry.  Make all the connections you can.

No matter who is on your team …. team skills.  You are 100% dependent on the people giving you information, so communicate respectfully and politely!  Leave sarcasm, blaming and whining out of your communication.

More advice from Dan: If you are an employee within a company, maximize the time you have there and learn all you can because some day you are likely to be a contractor.   And build good networks!

Thank you, Hadiya!

Listeners, please add to this topic in the comments section below or call us at 1-800-609-9006 x8055 (US and Canada) or 678-255-2174 x8055 (outside US and Canada) to record a message by phone.

LTGR Ep. #97: “Performer Support”

Thursday, December 1st, 2011


In this episode, Dan talks with Susan about an event he recently attended about integrating informal social and mobile into your learning strategy. The event was led by Bob Mosher and Conrad Gottfredson.

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Show Notes:

Bob Mosher and Conrad GottfredsonDan recently attended and ASTD sponsored event led by Bob Mosher and Conrad Gottfredson about integrating informal social and mobile into your learning strategy.

Dan describes it most about: Integrating performer support.

Performer versus performance? Putting the focus on the learner versus the system.

5 moments of need:

  1. When they have something new to learn (content)
  2. When they have to build on existing knowledge and need more
  3. When they need to apply the information
  4. When the environment changes
  5. When they have a problem to solve

Susan contrasts with traditional education and how learners are asked to make predictions.

Higher education has talked about learner centered design, but has also been sensitive to learning support. She gives an example.

Dan gives the business spin and asks what business does after the training. How does this fit into the real world? Embrace the whole environment.

How do you document the competencies that a learner is learning? Dan talks about the challenges of assessing some areas.

Ramping down and ramping up: Heavy instructor led activities ramp down to instructor support. Ramp back up to self directed component.

When you design your training strategy, think about the entire scope … ramp down and up.

A lot of money is spent on the ramp down, but not back up.

Support communities: How do we connect the learner to other people? That’s where social networking comes in.

We’ve always known the learner needed support when they are in the workplace, but now there are web-based tools that can help us look beyond the workplace.

Listeners, please add to this topic in the comments section below or call us at 1-800-609-9006 x8055 (US and Canada) or 678-255-2174 x8055 (outside US and Canada) to record a message by phone.